Relationships

Passion Planner

Source: Kickstarter

Yesterday I shared my belief that pros live and die by a calendaring system. This post tells you mine.

Let’s get this out of the way immediately: I’m not getting paid by Passion Planner.

One of my best friends recommended it to me a few weeks ago, and I’ve since adopted its approach.

I love it, so I thought I’d share it with you.

This planner is unique because it goes beyond tracking your time.

In addition to keeping a daily schedule, it recommends that you set a weekly focus, record good things that have happened during the week, and establish personal and work to-do lists. It also has you establish long term goals and conduct monthly reflections.

Now, I can’t afford the actual planner, so I’ve been using Google Keep. Here’s what my weekly intention looks like. I look at this almost every day:

Passion Planner

The bottom link goes to a Google Doc where I record how my week went and relate it back to the monthly goals I established at the beginning of January.

At the end of the month, I will write a monthly check-in, answering the following questions:

  • What was the most memorable part of the month? Describe it.
  • What were the three biggest lessons learned this past month?
  • Review your monthly priorities. Are you happy with how you spent your time? If not, what steps can you take the next month to adjust them? 
  • How are you different between this past month and the month before it?
  • What or who are you especially grateful for this past month? 
  • Name three things you can improve on this upcoming month. 
  • What concrete actions can you take to work toward these improvements?
  • From 1-10, how do you feel overall about this month?

I still have a lot of work to do to get my time management where I want it. It takes constant work to be the best person you can be. (And if you’re doing it right, you’ll always notice room for improvement.)

To ensure proper management of my time, I also follow a nightly routine of laying out my clothes for the next day and setting a to-do list for the next day based on my deadlines over the next week and a half.


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Five days a week you’ll receive messages that inspire you to live your best life. 

Your time and trust are precious. My promise to you: always strive for honesty, empathy, goodness, and usefulness.

andrew-amistad-RT0xyvwNB08-unsplash

If you text someone regularly and you’re always the only one asking questions, that person is displaying that they’re uninterested in understanding you.

If you put in a lot of work to make someone feel welcome or special and your work is complained about, you’re unappreciated.

Stand up for yourself. Command respect.

Self-absorption is, unfortunately, an all too common characteristic today. Here are 15 signs of it.

Selfie culture is vain culture. Don’t fall prey to the desire to please the wrong people.

The right people – good people – are encouraging. They’re generous. They’re thoughtful. They’re caring. They’re merciful. And they attempt to be positive influences.

Your time is the most important thing you can share. The moment you feel like you’re wasting it on someone who isn’t worth it, express your concerns.

And if the situation isn’t remedied, show bravery by walking away.

Photo by Andrew Amistad on Unsplash


Thank you for reading, my friend! If you enjoyed this article, please consider signing up for future posts by clicking the menu button in the top-left corner.

Five days a week you’ll receive messages that inspire you to live your best life. 

Your time and trust are precious. My promise to you: always strive for honesty, empathy, goodness, and usefulness.

etienne-boulanger-erCPgyXNlto-unsplash

People have a tendency to jump to conclusions about others.

It’s easy to navigate on assumptions.

The hard thing to do so is to take a step back and try to empathize.

While there’s a slim possibility that, yes, your coworker is evil and selfish or your supervisor is judgemental and incompetent, it’s more likely that you haven’t taken the time to get to know where they’re coming from.

They’re human, which means they’re complex, and probably see themselves as the good guy (or girl).

Everyone is learning. No one is perfect. And we all could take criticism a little better because we all want to think we’re doing our best.

Give folks the benefit of the doubt. They’re trying their best just like you, after all.

A romantic relationship, at it’s best, feels like the comfort and bliss of youth. A night in bed watching movies together seems like the times when you were young, hanging out with your best friend – because that person is your best friend.

That best friend dotingly cares for you while you’re sick, believes in you, pushes you to be better, makes you laugh, and soothes your sadness.

While this experience is rare (mostly because it takes so much work to build), there’s nothing quite as satisfying once you have it.

Even if the moment is only that, a moment, it’s worth the effort.

Three things could be said to constitute a well-lived life: impactful work, meaningful friendships, and fulfilling romantic companionship.

In the end, you might feel a sense of pride in your legacy or joy in your friendship, but there’s no replacement for unconditional love.

So cherish your friends, celebrate and seek accomplishments, and fight for love once you find it.

 

As we grow up and grow out from our family roots, we settle into our own world. There, surrounded by our first stuff, it can be easy to become selfish.

Independence allows us to be insular, to isolate ourselves from what’s uncomfortable or contradictory.

In relationships, the isolation might make us act in a way that is purely transactional. We like our worlds to be fair, balanced, and convenient. So we help folks who help us, and we say we’re busy if we think someone isn’t generous enough with their time for us.

But that’s not a good way to live your life.

Being a good person is sometimes about doing kind things for others – showing up for them, helping them move, picking up a call – even when they haven’t equally reciprocated, especially when it comes to family.

This is a part of leading by example.

If everyone kept a “piggy bank” of helpfulness, the world would be cynical and devoid of an important kind of love, a love of selflessness for those we care about despite their flaws. An unconditional love.

Do the right thing. Be generous, and show others how to act beyond themselves.

Take a moment this new year to tell someone that you appreciate them.

In 2020, I resolve to try to remember that everyone is just giving it their best shot and to do my best to make people feel important, comfortable, and special.

Good luck with your resolutions, friends.

 

This time of year can be tough on relationships.

Our significant other’s families can be difficult to tolerate.

Show up still if the family is important to them.

A good person does the right things for people they love, especially when it’s inconvenient or uncomfortable.